QuickPay Direct Deposit Explained

How you can get access to your paycheck up to two days early

You may have heard that a perk of online banking is getting your paycheck “up to two days early.” These claims actually refer to a direct deposit feature that can be super helpful in establishing a financial routine, making timely bill payments, and staying on top of your money.

The problem is that these types of “two days early” claims can be a bit confusing and leave a lot to the fine print. You’re not alone if you have some unanswered questions like…

🗓 Earlier than what date, exactly? 

🧐 Does payment in advance mean I’m receiving a loan? 

📲 What’s the connection between my employer and my online bank account? 

⁉️ How does it work???

Here’s a breakdown of how CARD provides access to paychecks up to two days early with QuickPay Direct Deposit (a feature of the CARD Premium Bank Account by Metabank). 

What “Early” Really Means

When we say “early,” what we mean is that you can get access to your paycheck faster than from a paper check.  

Little known fact: Most employers send out your paycheck information days before your scheduled payday. This way all parties have time to actually post your earnings (add your latest check to your balance). 

In this traditional system, even though employers send notice ahead of time, you still don’t get access to your money until your scheduled payday…  

But the QuickPay Direct Deposit feature doesn’t need the extra time! CARD works closely with MetaBank to post your money electronically within minutes of notice from your employer. 

This means that you can get access to your paycheck (spend your money, withdraw your money, roll around in your money – we don’t judge) up to two days earlier than you would normally from a paper check.

It’s Not A Loan, It’s Your Money

Popular misconception: If I’m receiving money in my account in “advance,” it must be a loan from my bank, right? 

Thankfully that assumption is incorrect. As previously mentioned, the “earlier access” claim refers to how a fintech company like CARD can work efficiently with an online-only bank like MetaBank to post your check to your account faster than the paper checks. 

We aren’t bypassing your employer, or giving you money that’s not yours – QuickPay Direct Deposit is not a loan. It’s your money, in the exact amount that you earned during the last pay period, just available in your balance sooner thanks to the streamlined logistics of online banking. 

CARD trusts our customers, we trust our financial technology, and we want to give you access to your hard-earned money as quickly and transparently as possible. 

What Time Does Direct Deposit Hit?

Because QuickPay Direct Deposit is not a loan, MetaBank’s ability to post your money is still 100% dependent on when your job sends out your paycheck’s details. This means that if your employer’s schedule changes, you might not get access to your paycheck on the same day, at the same time, every pay period. 

For example: If your employer sends your paycheck on Wednesday morning it could post to your account Wednesday. However, if the following payday they send your paycheck on Thursday night, your money may not post to your account until Friday.

The best way to know exactly what time your Direct Deposit hits is to get in contact with your job’s payroll provider and find out when they plan to initiate your check (aka send notice to the bank). Once you know the dates and general schedule, CARD will take care of the rest!

Get a push notification as soon as your Direct Deposit hits your account by turning on Rapid Alerts*, and keep up to date on the status of your paycheck in real time.  

Recap...

In a nutshell, that’s how CARD’s Premium Bank Account by MetaBank provides access to paychecks up to two days earlier with QuickPay Direct Deposit.

Still have questions? Visit https://card.com/premium or our FAQ Page for more information. 

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